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Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> dick cheney was a trained foreign policy expert. so was colin powell. >> indeed, the facts and iraq's behavior show that saddam hussein and his regime are concealing their efforts to produce more weapons of mass destruction. >> the national debate over going to war in iraq was heavily lopsided in favor of war. in the united states senate, the war resolution passed with 77 votes, only 23 senators opposed it, including only one republican rhode island senator rink on chafee. >> what concerns me most is the pattern we see applied to iraq, that is abandoning of our alliances and willing to be preemptive without any real evidence of weapons of mass destruction. >> in the house of representatives the war resolution passed with 296 votes. 133 house members voted against it, including a congresswoman from san francisco who was working her way up the leadership ladder. >> let's do what is proportionate, appropriate, which mitigates risk for our young people, another cost in addition to human lives, cost to terrorism and cost to the economy and another cost to our budget. this cost can be unl
now by two upstarts. lapid and bennett, both of whom are not focused in the main on foreign policy and security issues but on social and economicnes so it's a paradox, in order to maintain his relevance as a foreign policy national security guy-- which is his strong suit-- the fact is he does need a better relationship with obama because obama holds the key on that front, certainly on iran. >> reporter: speaking of iran-- and i'll come back to that relationship-- is what the president saided in an interview with israeli television, will that comfort israelis? >> it certainly should comfort israelis. after all, the record suggests that the administration has worked very, very hard on the iranian challenge and the president has said that take my word, we're not interested in containing iran, we're interested in preventing iran from developing nuclear technology. i think it should assuage israelis who are concerned about this issue i wonder why-- and this seems to be part of the conversation in washington-- that israelis need an american president to show some deep emotional attachmen
there was a role in america's foreign policy. he wants america to pull back. he pointed to a split within the republican party on national security before almost anybody else did. he really actually outlined some of the divisions. when you look at his policies what he stands for, abolishing the departments of education, commerce, trade, the federal reserve. i think when he gets more out there in the public, when he's not just giving a talk at cpac, i just think that what he says is going to be too extreme for members of the republican party who support still the hawkish line of american involvement in the world and i think for clearly when he gets into i think into middle america, for running for anything like a presidential nomination that would be a very tricky position, some of those domestic issues, too. >> eugene, this is coming at a time that the gop is trying to reconfigure, the autopsy, what do you do to a corpse to bring it back to life? there are specific policy recommendations, raines preeb is's document. one was about gay marriage and one was about immigration. how do you move
of his top strategic foreign policy advisors and he assumes because that is the sentence that is focused on that is what he wants to come out of the press conference. >> bret: next up, the two leaders on syria and the developing situation with the possibility of chemical weapons. ♪ looking for a litter with natural ingredients that helps neutralize odors. discover tidy cats pure nature. uniquely formulated with cedar, pine, and corn. >>> i am deeply skeptical of any claim in fact it was the opposition that used chemical weapons. i made clear that use of chemical weapons is a game changer. i won't make an announcement today about the next steps because we have to gather the facts. when you start seeing weapons that can cause potential devastation, and mass casualties, a you let that genie out of the bottle, then you are looking potentially at especially more horrific scenes than we have already seen in syria. >> bret: president obama talking about the possibility of the chemical weapons were used in syria. the house intelligence chairman mike rogers says there is a high probably now the
't agree on everything -- >> anything. i believe that diplomacy should be the cornerstone of any foreign policy. >> and i can see russia from my house! >> seems like yesterday when you watch that, but it's been four and a half years since tina fey introduced her stunning impression of sarah palin on "saturday night live." and just when tina fey fans thought they had seen the last of that palin impression, one man, the only man who could do this, was able to get her to do it once again tuesday night. >> would you allow me to introduce sarah palin, please? >> we could try. >> i'm the one taking the chance, not you, pal. you asked joe biden if you could call him "joe." >> uh-huh. >> shall i address you as governor? you served only half a term, so what's the right term of address? >> well, i'll tell ya, i don't know. and i'm a half governor or you could call me a maverick at large. >> perhaps gov. >> gov would be fine by me too. >> i know that you're very fond of shooting wolves from a helicopter. which is understandable enough. have your views on gun laws or wolves changed at all? >> you kn
beginning that barack obama's the most controlling foreign policy president since richard nixon. hillary clinton was given very true truly cons quential issues to manage. kerry may be in a better situation because it's legacy time and obama is trying to figure out what do todo on the domestic side. he might turn john kerry, who is quite capable, into a manager in chief on the israeli/palestinian issue. >> jamie: let me focus on that. what is realistic, aaron? the palestinians want settlement building to stop. benjamin netanyahu says no. can we ever get them to the table with preconditions? >> no, not with preconditions. i think the president really dodged the one headache he created for himself in the first term, when was to demand a comprehensive settlement freeze, which no israeli prime minister would agree. to so i think you will not see a resumption of formal negotiations. you will see quiet contacts between the israelis and palestinians and a lot of frequent flyer miles for john kerry, having separate conversations with the israelis and the palestinians to see whether or not there i
and director of the foreign policy program at the brookings institution in washington, d.c. and david makovsky is the director of the project on the middle east peace process at the washington institute for near east policy. welcome to both of you. martin, let me start with you. as the president goes to israel, what will he find in general terms in this new government? what do we know or not know? >> well, it's only a couple of days old. so it's a very hard to tell exactly what it's going to shape up to. what we have is right wing party with a shift within the likud further in the right in terms of its composition. we have a large center party, lapid, this new rising star. then to his left is tzipi livni who was the only candidate to campaign on the two-state solution. he only got 56. >> brown: somehow they all worked together or were supposed to work together. >> there's a special glue on the seats of israeli cabinet chairs which kind of keep them stuck there for a while at least. they have to respond to their constituency. that is the key point here. their constituents wants them to focus on
whether it's on the road with the secretary of state or here in washington where i cover foreign policy, and that's what motivated me to write "the secretary," to sort of take a step back and digest everything i had seen and learned. i had learned a lot being in this front row seat to history, to diplomacy. watching all those different events unfold. and writing book was a very maturing experience as well as i digested, as you say, some of what i had seen and tried to come to some of the conclusions that i was trying to get at. but when it comes to the secretary of state and the people around her, i think that what i found striking is her ability to stay focused at all times as much as possible on what is happening. she doesn't get distracted by the details if they're not important. obviously, details often matter. but she has an ability to stay focused on the big picture. how is what is happening in afghanistan impacting what they might be doing in the middle east? how is what is happening in the middle east impacting what they're trying to do in asia? i think she had a good sense of w
one but there are very serious foreign policy issues here, not the least of being the civil war in syria. the white house says it is looking into allegations about the use of chemical weapons. the house and intelligence committee says there is quote high probability that chemical agents were useed. what will prime minister netanyahu be asking of the united states in terms of ending the on flikt in syria? >> well, first of all, the president, president obama's, credibility is very, very critical. they is said from the white house podium that any use from the chemical weapons would be a red line. presumably this would be the trigger for more american involvement. as you know, craig, u.s. has been behind other allies, britain and france pressing on the u.s. to do more. we have done human. aid, nonlethal aid, helped to the combatance, but not what they have been pleading for. which is more weaponry. so there's a lot of pressure on the white house to become more involved in syria. this is skoesten shl because they have to wonder about what will follow the civil war. if assad is going
factor in foreign policy decisions of both democratic and republican administrations for years to come. what do you think? >> i wouldn't necessarily agree, because, you know, in vietnam we said as the colonel said we learned our lesson but we didn't learn a lesson in the iraq war. even now, the same warhawks are saying we should be in syria. we should go and bomb iran. so i feel as if there is a premise we should be more isolated, that's not the temperature of the republican party for the most part, besides rand paul, who is separate. that's a shame. because we as a country should always be the reluctant warrior. when you look back now to the ten-year anniversary of the iraq war to know this war was started as you mentioned, chris, because the bush administration said there was weapons of mass destruction, and because they said there was a connection with 9/11, neither of which were true and our intelligence agency said to the administration this isn't true yet they still moved forward at the cost of over 4400 americans losing their lives. >> almost 4500 american troops killed. at leas
funding. the same way democrats have often done on some foreign policy issues in the past with a republican president. stop the money is how you stop the law. but i think it's going to be a you have tough thing to do. it's, again, once the program gets in place, it's hard to take it back. and one of these things the governors have done when they let the federal government set up the system is that takes the states out of having any ability to set up the exchange themself. i mean, it gives the state less say and the federal government more say. that's going to be a tough thing for the republicans. you know, republicans want more say in the states. so even in times of posing obamacare, they're actually giving more power to the federal government. it's very complicated issue. of. jon: well, it is complicated, and it's three years old, and most of its provisions really haven't kicked in yet. that's what remains to be seen, how, you know, people adjust to it as they actually have to sign on for this thing. joe trippi -- >> that's right. jon: -- we'll continue to keep a watch on
, the president's approval on handling foreign policy is more or less the split 46% approve, 40% disapprove. he was in the country 11 times over the last decade. here is a sample. >> here is the main palace, the living quarters. it was struck in the first 36 hours of war. it is in this courtroom that he could face justice. he could be in this very chair on trial before the judicial system that he controlled and manipulated for 35 years. reporter: members of the iraqi government say they will likely keep the arc of victory as a reminder of just how brutal saddam hussein really was. jenna: we are so used to seeing him and not drill. >> a long time and a few pounds ago. jenna: what are your reflections? >> my first time was with secretary rumsfeld in iraq. really from 9/11 onward. on the first trip, it was in a bus like a giant fishbowl. a glass bus going down the middle of baghdad. there was not an insurgency. we didn't have jackets on as we worked through baghdad. that dramatically changed over time, as you know. it really exploded to the point surge that was implemented under general betray pet
foreign policy. each case is treated as an isolated situation. look at this itinerary, what he has planned there is not much to improve the relationship with the israeli government in a content level. martha: president obama has said we are not sort of this super power that we used to be in many ways. the world has changed, right? so there is an opportunity here to be a leader, in terms of israel. to go to israel, doug and say look nothing has changed in this relationship we are steadfast in our support of israel, which of course he has said but some people feel the meaning behind it hasn't been as forceful as in the past. >> i agree with you, martha, if he goes and does that and i fully expect he will, that is an important state. standing with our only stable democratic ally in the middle east is hugely important given the unrest in egypt and throughout the region. i think that clarifying positions on iran, the red line and what we're prepared to do and where we've prepared to do it is critically important. i'm glad he's willing to do that even if it's limited to just that. martha: look a
nations, united states is coming up too much with foreign policy and helping the fallen in getting involved too much. -- getting involved with foreign nations too much. u.n. another call on the did you want to weigh in on that? way it ist is not the seen in the world, where people feel the united states is not engaged enough after recent years. host: nathan guttman is with jewish daily forward and said arikat with al-quds. question had a quick and i would like a clarification of it. that the two me state solution is dead. the situation is static. here is my question. understood that all of the palestinians in the west bay and in gaza, are they subject -- in the west bank and in gaza, are they subject to israel? do we have a situation where palestinians do not get rights? guttman? the minority of the palestinians in east jerusalem do have is really i.d. cards. arelegal terms is that they an occupied population. guest: absolutely. the occupation that has gone on for far too long has denied palestinians the most basic of rights. israelis can arrest people, as we have seen last night.
of these things in the world that richard travels in, the foreign policy hands writer establishment there was a great uproar when this came out and i think most people had never seen anything quite like it from a leader in the middle east. >> fair statement. >>> coming up on "morning joe," the rise of the retrowife. why a new group of modern feminists saying having it all really means staying at home? we will discuss this with campbell brown, cosmo's joanna coles and the bbckatty kay. . ♪ for tapping into a wealth of experience. for access to one of the top wealth management firms in the country. for a team of financial professionals who provide customized solutions. for all of your wealth management and retirement goals, discover how pnc wealth management can help you achieve. visit pnc.com/wealthsolutions to find out more. in the middle of the night it can be frustrating. it's hard to turn off and go back to sleep. intermezzo is the first and only prescription sleep aid approved for use as needed in the middle of the night when you can't get back to sleep. it's an effective slee
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)